Please note: This site refers to the work of the Center of Excellence via a grant from the federal Office on Women's Health 2007-2010, and should be considered out-of-date.


 

  UWIN Projects: BodyWorks

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Web site: BodyWorks

Video Overview

Gender Focus IconGender Focus for the BodyWorks Project:
Body Works is intended for girls, but families and boys can attend. Eating right and physical activity is for everyone-even adolescents. Targeting mothers who plan and execute nutrition and much of the physical activity for a family, Body Works helps women promote health living in families..

About BodyWorks
BodyWorks is described by the National Office of Women’s Health as a program designed to help parents and caregivers of adolescents improve family eating and activity habits. The program and its materials are available in English and Spanish. The program focuses on parents and caregivers as role models and provides them with hands-on tools to make small, specific behavior changes to prevent obesity and help maintain a healthy weight.

The Utah Health Information Network (UWIN) received funding from The Office on Women's Health, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, to pilot test the effectiveness of the BodyWorks workshop in community, migrant and homeless health care programs in Utah. Since the fall of 2007, UWIN has been conducted Train-the-Trainer workshops with community health center staff members, Girl Scout leaders, religious program leaders and other community members using the BodyWorks Toolkit and training materials. Since that time, several communities have successfully completed the training and offered subsequent BodyWorks workshops to those in their communities.

A learning experience early in the Utah BodyWorks effort involved the truncating of the 10-week BodyWorks program to a 6-week workshop model. The National Office of Women's Health approved the development of a 6-week workshop model as an alternative to the traditional 10-week workshop format. This truncated, 6-week workshop is more acceptable to some workshop attendees while the 10-week workshop model has found success in Utah as well. Since 2008, there have been seven parent/caregiver sessions offered at the following locations: Bear Lake Community Health Center; Mountainlands Community Health Center in Provo (integrated into their "Well Women Care" program); Lindon; and Salt Lake City.

The Utah contact for the BodyWorks Train-the-Trainer sessions is Nikki Mihalopoulos, MD, MPH, Adolescent Medicine Physician and Assistant Professor of Pediatrics at the University of Utah School of Medicine. Dr. Mihalopoulos is available at nicole.mihalopoulos@hsc.utah.edu for more information about BodyWorks or to learn about a Train-the-Trainer session in your area.


For more information on the national BodyWorks program, visit the web site at http://www.womenshealth.gov/BodyWorks/find.cfm. The Office on Women's Health, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, developed BodyWorks following two years of formative research.